50-States Sexual Harassment Training Requirements

Thousands of employers choose Clear Law Institute’s sexual harassment training.

Some employers erroneously believe that they only need to provide sexual harassment training and other forms of workplace harassment prevention training to employees in states and local jurisdictions that have statutes requiring such training. While California, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Maine, New York State, and New York City have passed statutes requiring sexual harassment training, other federal and state laws, regulations, and court decisions have made clear that employers should provide anti-harassment training to all employees in all states. This page describes why sexual harassment training is essential in all states. At the bottom of the page, you will find information on the sexual harassment training requirements of each state.

State Statutes Requiring or Encouraging Training

Connecticut and Maine have long required employers to provide sexual harassment training at least once. Connecticut previously required the training only of supervisors. Connecticut now requires harassment training for all employees by October 1, 2020. Since California AB 1825 became effective in 2005, California has required sexual harassment training for supervisors every two years. SB 1343 expanded that requirement so California employers are now required to train all employees by January 1, 2021, and every two years thereafter. New York State and New York City have passed laws requiring annual sexual harassment training for all employees, with the first training having been due by October 9, 2019. Delaware also passed a law requiring sexual harassment training every two years, with an initial deadline of January 1, 2020. Finally, Illinois passed SB75, which requires sexual harassment training annually for all employees starting in 2020. In addition to the above mentioned states that require employers to provide sexual harassment training, many other states, such as Colorado, Florida, Hawaii, Iowa, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Ohio, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Utah, and Vermont, Wisconsin, have laws that “encourage” employers to provide such training.

State Courts

Some state courts have interpreted their state anti-harassment laws to make harassment training essential. For example, in Gaines v. Bellino, the New Jersey Supreme Court held that, in determining whether an employer is liable for co-worker harassment, the Court would examine factors such as whether the employer had provided anti-harassment training. According to the Court, the anti-harassment training “must be mandatory for supervisors and managers, and must be available to all employees of the organization.” An employer’s training obligations can also go beyond training permanent employees. In 2015, in Jones v. Dr. Pepper Snapple Group, the Appellate Division of the Superior Court of New Jersey ruled against an employer in a motion for summary judgment in part because the employer had not provided harassment prevention training to a temporary employee.

EEOC

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has issued guidelines, which apply to employers in all states, stating that employers periodically “should provide [harassment prevention] training to all employees to ensure they understand their rights and responsibilities.” Further, the EEOC’s 2016 Report from the Select Task Force on the Study of Harassment in the Workplace noted that “[t]raining should be conducted and reinforced on a regular basis for all employees.”

Federal Courts

Federal court decisions for years have shown that employers who do not train all employees may lose their ability to avoid punitive damages in a harassment lawsuit. In the Kolstad v. American Dental Association case, the U.S. Supreme Court held that employers could avoid punitive damages in harassment and discrimination cases if the employer could show that it had made “good faith efforts” to prevent harassment and discrimination. In determining “good faith efforts,” the Court held that:

The purposes underlying Title VII are. . . advanced where employers are encouraged to adopt antidiscrimination policies and to educate their personnel on Title VII’s prohibitions.

Many lower courts have ruled that to avoid punitive damages employers must have provided harassment training to their employees. In Swinton v. Potomac Corporation, for example, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a punitive damage award of $1 million in a racial harassment case, noting in part that the company had not educated its workforce on its harassment policy. Likewise, in Hanley v. Doctors Hospital of Shreveport, the court upheld a jury’s award of punitive damages in a sexual harassment and retaliation case in part because the employer had not provided its employees sexual harassment training.

Decisions by federal courts have shown that employers who fail to provide harassment prevention training may even lose their ability to raise an affirmative defense in a harassment lawsuit. In the joint cases of Faragher v. City of Boca Raton and Burlington Industries, Inc. v. Ellerth, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that an employer could escape liability for “hostile environment” harassment committed by a supervisor if it could prove that: (1) the employer took reasonable care to “prevent and correct promptly” any harassing behavior; and (2) the harassment victim unreasonably failed to complain.

Since the Supreme Court’s decisions in the Faragher and Ellerth cases, courts around the country have made clear that to raise an affirmative defense to harassment claims, employers cannot simply have a harassment policy; in addition, they should provide their employees harassment training. For example, in the 2015 case of Pullen v. Caddo Parish Sch. Bd., the Fifth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals held that an employer was not entitled to summary judgment in part because it had not provided harassment prevention training to its employees. Similarly, in Marrero v. Goya of Puerto Rico, Inc. the First Circuit ruled against an employer that had not provided harassment prevention training to the plaintiff employees. In addition to federal appellate court decisions, several federal trial courts have reached similar conclusions. (See, Clark v. UPS; Miller v. Woodharbor Molding & Millworks, Inc.; Hill v. The Children’s Village.)

As these examples make clear, employers’ views on harassment prevention training must shift from “nice-to-have” to “must-have”—for all employees in all states. This paradigm shift should help reduce the occurrence of workplace harassment and protect employers from liability in high-stakes harassment lawsuits.

Learn more about Clear Law Institute’s critically-acclaimed online sexual harassment training.

About the Author

Michael Johnson, CEO of Clear Law Institute, is a former U.S. Department of Justice attorney who brought one of DOJ’s first “pattern or practice” sexual harassment cases. He has provided training and consulting on harassment prevention or investigations to organizations around the world, such as the EEOC, the United Nations, and Google. He is a graduate of Duke University and Harvard Law School.

50-State Sexual Harassment Training Requirements

Alabama

While sexual harassment training in Alabama is not specifically required by state statute, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

Alabama law prohibits harassment and discrimination based on age (40+). See Ala. Code § 25-1-21.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Alabama Sexual Harassment Training

Alaska

While sexual harassment training in Alaska is not specifically required by state statute, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

The Alaska Human Rights Law prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such age, ancestry, color, disability, marital status, national origin (including ancestry), parenthood, race, religion, and sex (including pregnancy). For more information on Alaska equal employment opportunity requirements, see Alaska Commission for Human Rights.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Alaska Sexual Harassment Training

Arizona

While sexual harassment training in Arizona is not specifically required by state statute, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

The Arizona Civil Rights Act prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (40+), color, disability, genetic information, national origin, race, religion or creed, or sex (including pregnancy and related conditions). For more information on Arizona equal employment opportunity requirements, see Arizona Attorney General – Employment Discrimination.

Local ordinances provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Arizona Sexual Harassment Training

Arkansas

While sexual harassment training in Arkansas is not specifically required by state statute, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

The Arkansas Civil Rights Act prohibits discrimination or harassment on the basis of protected characteristics such as the following: color, disability, national origin (including ancestry), race, religion, and sex/gender (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related conditions). Additionally, the Arkansas Genetic Information in the Workplace Act prohibits discrimination on the basis of genetic information.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace

Learn more about our Arkansas Sexual Harassment Training

California

All employers with five or more employees must provide sexual harassment training every two years. New employees and promoted supervisors must be trained within six months of hire/promotion. Training for supervisors must be 2-hours in length; for non-supervisors, the training must be 1-hour in length. Training must include content on abusive conduct, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, remedies available to victims, and practical examples. Training must be conducted by a trainer with expertise in harassment and discrimination. See Cal. Gov. Code §1250.12 CCR § 11024.

For more information on California equal employment opportunity requirements, see Department of Fair Employment & Housing.

Read our white paper detailing the requirements of California’s sexual harassment training laws

Colorado

The Colorado Civil Rights Commission recommends that employers “take all steps necessary to prevent discrimination, including harassment, from occurring, such as … training.” See 3 CCR 708-1, Rule 20.6. See also Civil Rights Division Questions (recommending practices to "avoid a complaint of discrimination, including but not limited to, periodic civil rights protections and responsibilities training…").

Additionally, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover not just sexual harassment, but all forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

The Colorado Fair Employment Practices Act prohibits discrimination or harassment on the basis of protected characteristics such as age (40+), ancestry, color, creed, disability, gender identity or expression, marriage to a coworker in certain circumstances, national origin, race (including hair texture, hair type, or a protective hairstyle commonly or historically associated with race, such as braids, locs, twists, tight coils or curls, cornrows, Bantu knots, Afros, and headwraps), religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related conditions), and sexual orientation.

For more information on Colorado equal employment opportunity requirements, see Colorado DRA Civil Rights Division, Discrimination.

Local ordinances provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Colorado Sexual Harassment Training

Connecticut

All employers with three or more employees must provide two hours of sexual harassment training to all employees. Employees must receive the training within six months of hire. All Connecticut employers, regardless of size, must provide sexual harassment training to supervisors within six months of promotion to a supervisory role. Training must include content on state and federal laws prohibiting sexual harassment, definitions, types of conduct that constitutes sexual harassment, and remedies available to victims. See Conn. Gen. Stat. § 46a-54(15)(B)Conn. Agencies Regs. § 46a-54-204.

For more information on Connecticut equal employment opportunity requirements, see Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities.

Read our white paper detailing the requirements of Connecticut’s sexual harassment training laws

Delaware

All employers with 50 or more employees must provide sexual harassment training for all employees and supervisors. Training must be interactive and new employees must be trained within one year of hire. Supervisors must receive additional content on the responsibilities of a supervisor in preventing and correcting sexual harassment and the legal prohibition against retaliation. All employees and supervisors must be retrained every two years. See 19 Del. Code § 711A (g).

For more information on Delaware equal employment opportunity requirements, see Delaware Division of Human Relations.

Read our white paper detailing the requirements of Delaware’s sexual harassment training laws

District of Columbia

Tipped Employee Businesses:  All employers of tipped employees are required to provide sexual harassment prevention training to all employees, including managers, owners, and operators. New employees must be trained within 90 days of hire. Existing employees must be trained within two years. Managers and owners must receive the training every two years. See Tipped Wage Workers Fairness Amendment Act of 2018 B 913; as amended by D.C. Law 23-149, Subtitle G.

All DC employers: EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

The D.C. Human Rights Law prohibits workplace harassment and discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (18+), color, disability, family responsibilities (supporting a person in a dependent relationship, including children, grandchildren, and parents), gender identity or expression, genetic information, marital or domestic partnership status, matriculation (being enrolled in a college, university, or some types of secondary school), national origin (the country or area from which one’s ancestors came), personal appearance (outward appearance, subject to business requirements or standards), political affiliation (belonging to or supporting a political party) , race (on a person’s ancestry or ethnicity), religion, sex/gender (including pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions, breastfeeding, and reproductive health decisions), sexual orientation, or status as a victim or family member of a victim of domestic violence, a sexual offense, or stalking.

For more information on D.C. equal employment opportunity requirements, see District of Columbia Office of Human Rights.

Learn more about our District of Columbia Sexual Harassment Training

Florida

While sexual harassment training in Florida is not specifically required by state statute, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state protected characteristics.

The Florida Civil Rights Act prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as the following: age, ancestry, color, disability, marital status, national origin, race, religion, and sex (including pregnancy). For more information on Florida equal employment opportunity requirements, see Florida Commission on Human Rights – Employment.

Local ordinances provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Florida Sexual Harassment Training

Georgia

While sexual harassment training in Georgia is not specifically required by state statute, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

The Georgia Age Discrimination Act prohibits workplace discrimination based on age (40-70). Additionally, the Georgia Equal Employment for Persons with Disabilities Code prohibits discrimination based on disability. For more information on Georgia equal employment opportunity requirements, see Georgia Commission on Equal Opportunity – Equal Employment Division.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Georgia Sexual Harassment Training

Hawaii

The Hawaii Civil Rights Commission strongly recommends employers provide sexual harassment training. See Hawaii Civil Rights Commission on Sexual Harassment in the Workplace (to prevent workplace harassment, employers should adopt a prevention program that includes “training of supervisory personnel about their specific responsibilities, and training of all employees about the sexual harassment policy and grievance procedures”); see also Admin. Rules 4 §12-46-109 (g).

Additionally, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should workplace harassment training to all employees periodically.

The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics. The Hawaii Employment Practices Act prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age, ancestry, color, disability, gender identity or expression, genetic information, marital status, race, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related conditions and reproductive health decisions), sexual orientation, and status as a victim of domestic or sexual violence.

For more information on Hawaii equal employment opportunity requirements, see Hawaii Civil Rights Commission Publications.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Hawaii Sexual Harassment Training

Idaho

The Idaho Human Rights Commission recommends that employers provide sexual harassment prevention training: “Effective policies and employee training can go a long way towards discouraging improper conduct before it becomes serious enough to violate the law.”

Additionally, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

The Idaho Human Rights Act prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (over 40), color, disability, national origin, race, religion, and sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related conditions). For more information on Idaho equal employment opportunity requirements, see Idaho Human Rights Commission, Law Overview.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Idaho Sexual Harassment Training.

Illinois

All employers are required to provide sexual harassment training to all employees in Illinois annually. The training must include an explanation of sexual harassment, examples of conduct that constitutes unlawful sexual harassment, a summary of federal and state statutes including remedies available to victims, and a summary of employer responsibilities for preventing, investigating, and correcting sexual harassment. In addition, restaurant and bar owners are required to provide industry-specific sexual harassment training to all employees, available in both English and Spanish. See Ill. Comp. Stat., Chap. 775, § 2-105(B)(5).

For more information on Illinois equal employment opportunity requirements, see Illinois Department of Human Rights.

Read our white paper detailing the requirements of Illinois’s sexual harassment training laws

Indiana

While sexual harassment training in Indiana is not specifically required by state statute, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically.

The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics. The Indiana Civil Rights Act prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (between 40-75), ancestry, color, disability, national origin, race, religion, and sex. For more information on Indiana equal employment opportunity requirements, see Indiana Civil Rights Commission FAQs.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Indiana Sexual Harassment Training

Iowa

According to the Iowa Civil Rights Commission, employers are obligated to take active steps to prevent harassment before it occurs, and training new employees, particularly supervisory employees, is one such step employers should take. See ICRC Fact Sheet – Harassment in the Workplace at 3.

Additionally, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

The Iowa Civil Rights Act prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (18+), color, creed, disability, gender identity, national origin, race, religion, and sex (including pregnancy and related conditions), sexual orientation. Additionally, Iowa Code § 729.6 prohibits discrimination based on genetic information.

For more information on Iowa equal employment opportunity requirements, see Iowa Civil Rights Commission.

Local ordinances provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Iowa Sexual Harassment Training

Kansas

According to the Kansas Human Rights Commission, training is an important aspect of the employer’s duty to prevent workplace sexual harassment. See KHRC: Harassment and Reasonable Care, at 8. The Kansas Attorney General’s Office recommends that employers provide training to all supervisory employees.

Additionally, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

Kansas law prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (40 or older), ancestry, color, disability, gender identity or expression*, genetic information, military status, national origin, race, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related conditions), sexual orientation*, and status as a victim of domestic violence or sexual assault. See Kansas Act Against Discrimination; Kansas Age Discrimination in Employment Act; Kan. Stat. § 44-1126; and Kan. Stat. § 44-1132. (The Kansas Human Rights Commission interprets state law consistent with the Supreme Court’s decision in Bostock v. Clayton County. Therefore, discrimination based on gender identity or expression or based on sexual orientation is a form of sex discrimination under Kansas law.)

For more information on Kansas equal employment opportunity requirements, see Kansas Human Rights Commission.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Kansas Sexual Harassment Training.

Kentucky

While sexual harassment training in Kentucky is not specifically required by state statute, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

The Kentucky Civil Rights Act prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (40+), color, disability, national origin, race, religion (including all aspects of religious observance and practice), and sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, breastfeeding/lactation, and related conditions). For more information on Kentucky equal employment opportunity requirements, see Kentucky Commission on Human Rights FAQs.

Local ordinances provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Kentucky Sexual Harassment Training

Louisiana

While sexual harassment training in Louisiana is not specifically required by state statute, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

Louisiana law prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (40+), color, creed, disability, genetic information (including Sickle cell trait), national origin, race, religion, and sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, breastfeeding, and related conditions). See La. Rev. Stat. s RS 23:301 et seq. For more information on Louisiana equal employment opportunity requirements, see Louisiana Commission on Human Rights.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Louisiana Sexual Harassment Training.

Maine

All employers with 15 or more employees located or doing business in Maine must provide sexual harassment training to all employees within one year of hire. Supervisors and managers must receive additional training within one year of promotion. Training must include the definition and illegality of sexual harassment under state and federal laws, examples of sexual harassment, information on the employer’s complaint process, legal recourse, and information on protections against retaliation. See 26 Me. Rev. Stat. § 807(3).

For more information on Maine equal employment opportunity requirements, see Maine Human Rights Commission.

Read our white paper detailing the requirements of Maine’s sexual harassment training laws

Maryland

While sexual harassment training in Maryland is not specifically required by state statute, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

The Maryland Fair Employment Practices Act prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age, ancestry, color, disability, gender identity or expression, genetic information, marital status, national origin, race (including traits associated with race such as hair texture, afro hairstyles, and protective hairstyles such as braids, twists, and locks), religion (including all aspects of religious observances, practice, and belief), sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related conditions), and sexual orientation.

For more information on Maryland equal employment opportunity requirements, see Maryland Civil Rights Commission – Employment Discrimination.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Maryland Sexual Harassment Training

Massachusetts

According to Massachusetts law, employers should provide sexual harassment training to new employees within one year of hire. They should provide additional training to supervisors regarding their responsibilities and methods necessary to ensure immediate and appropriate corrective action when responding to complaints. See M.G.L. c. 151B § 3A(e).

Similarly, the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination recommends employers provide training because “an employer’s commitment to providing anti-harassment training to its workforce may be a factor in determining liability or the appropriate remedy.” The MCAD notes that in cases “where punitive damages may be sought, evidence of training may also mitigate damages.” See MCAD Guidelines on 151B: Sexual Harassment in the Workplace at 8-9 and fn. 89.

Additionally, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

The Massachusetts Fair Employment Practices Law prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (40+), ancestry, color, disability, gender identity, genetic information, military service or veteran status, national origin, race, religious creed, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, breastfeeding/lactation, and related conditions), and sexual orientation.

For more information on Massachusetts equal employment opportunity requirements, see Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination – Employment Discrimination.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Massachusetts Sexual Harassment Training

Michigan

While sexual harassment training in Michigan is not specifically required by state statute, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

Michigan’s anti-discrimination laws prohibit workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age, color, disability, gender identity, genetic information, height, marital status, national origin, race, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related conditions), sexual orientation, and weight. See Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights Act and People with Disabilities Civil Rights Act. The Michigan Civil Rights Commission interprets the prohibition against discrimination based on “sex” to include discrimination because of gender identity and sexual orientation. See Michigan Civil Rights Commission Interpretive Statement 2018-1; MCRC June 15, 2020 Press Release.

For more information on Michigan equal employment opportunity requirements, see Michigan Department of Civil Rights.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Michigan Sexual Harassment Training

Minnesota

While sexual harassment training in Minnesota is not specifically required by state statute, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state protected characteristics.

The Minnesota Human Rights Act prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (18+), color, creed, disability, familial status, gender identity, marital status, national origin (including lineal ancestry), race, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions), and sexual orientation. Additionally, genetic information is a protected characteristic under Minn. Stat. Ann. § 181.974.

For more information on Minnesota equal employment opportunity requirements, see Minnesota Department of Human Rights, Employment Discrimination and the Minnesota Human Rights Act

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Minnesota sexual harassment training

Mississippi

While sexual harassment training in Mississippi is not specifically required by state statute, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

Mississippi law prohibits discrimination on the basis of military service or veteran status. See Miss. Code § 33-1-15.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Mississippi Sexual Harassment Training

Missouri

While sexual harassment training in Missouri is not specifically required by state statute, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

The Missouri Human Rights Act prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (40-69), ancestry, color, disability, gender identity or expression, national origin, race, religion, and sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related conditions and including transgender status and non-stereotypical attributes or behaviors). Additionally, the Missouri Law Against Genetic Discrimination prohibits discrimination on the basis of genetic information. The Missouri Supreme Court has held that sex discrimination may include discrimination based on transgender status and non-stereotypical attributes or behaviors. See Lampley v. Mo. Comm’n on Human Rights (2019) (plaintiff who did not exhibit stereotypically male behavior and appearance stated a cause of action for sex discrimination under the Missouri Human Rights Act); R.M.A. by Appleberry v. Blue Springs R-IV Sch. Dist (2019) (transgender student alleging sex discrimination stated a cause of action under the Missouri Human Rights Act).

For more information on Missouri equal employment opportunity requirements, see Missouri Commission on Human Rights – Employment Discrimination.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Missouri Sexual Harassment Training

Montana

According to the Montana Department of Labor & Industry, employers should provide training to all employees in sexual harassment prevention. See Montana DLIR. Sexual Harassment is Against the Law.

Additionally, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

The Montana Human Rights Act prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age, ancestry, caregiver status, color, creed, disability, gender identity or expression, marital status, national origin, race, religion (including all aspects of religious observance, practice, and belief), sex (including pregnancy and related conditions), and sexual orientation. Additionally, according to the Montana Human Rights Commission, discrimination based on gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, or status as a caregiver is a form of sex discrimination under the Montana Human Rights Act.

For more information on Montana equal employment opportunity requirements in Montana Human Rights Commission – Employment Discrimination.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Montana Sexual Harassment Training

Nebraska

According to the Nebraska Equal Opportunity Commission, “Employers need to have an effective complaint process, provide anti-harassment training to all employees, and take immediate and appropriate action when an individual complains” to prevent workplace harassment. See NEOC – Eliminating Discrimination in Nebraska (emphasis supplied).

Additionally, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state protected characteristics.

The Nebraska Fair Employment Practice Act and the Nebraska Age Discrimination in Employment Act prohibit workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (40+), color, disability, genetic information, marital status, national origin, race, religion, and sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions). For more information on Nebraska equal employment opportunity requirements, see Nebraska Equal Opportunity Commission FAQs.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Nebraska Sexual Harassment Training

Nevada

According to the Nevada Equal Rights Commission, employers should adopt strategies to prevent discrimination and harassment, such as training. See Nevada ERC Training and Outreach.

Additionally, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

The Nevada Fair Employment Practices Act prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (40+), color, disability, gender identity or expression, genetic information, national origin, race, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related conditions), sexual orientation, and status as a member of Nevada National Guard.

For more information on Nevada equal employment opportunity requirements, see Nevada Equal Rights Commission.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Nevada Sexual Harassment Training

New Hampshire

While sexual harassment training in New Hampshire is not specifically required by state statute, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state protected characteristics.

The New Hampshire Law Against Discrimination prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age, color, disability, gender identity or expression, marital status, national origin (including ancestry), race, religious creed, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related medical conditions), sexual orientation, and status as a victim of violence, harassment, sexual assault, or stalking. See also N.H. Rev. Stat. § 110B:65 (membership in New Hampshire National Guard); N.H. Rev. Stat. § 141-H:3 (genetic information).

For more information on New Hampshire equal employment opportunity requirements, see New Hampshire Commission for Human Rights.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our New Hampshire Sexual Harassment Training.

New Jersey

While sexual harassment training in New Jersey is not yet specifically required by state statute, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

Additionally, in February 2020, Governor Phil Murphy introduced a bill that would require all employers to provide sexual harassment prevention training to all employees every two years. See Governor Murphy Announces Legislation to Overhaul New Jersey’s Anti-Workplace Harassment Laws for Public and Private Employers.

Moreover, the New Jersey Supreme Court has held that in determining whether an employer is liable for co-worker harassment, the Court would examine factors such as whether the employer had provided anti-harassment training. Such training “must be mandatory for supervisors and managers and must be available to all employees of the organization.” See Gaines v. Bellino, 173 N.J. 301. In addition, a New Jersey Superior Court has ruled against an employer’s motion for summary judgment in part because that employer did not provide anti-harassment training to a temporary employee. See Jones v. Dr. Pepper Snapple Group, No. A-2314-13T1, 2015 WL 4602485 (N.J. Super. Ct. Aug. 3, 2015).

For more information on New Jersey equal employment opportunity requirements, see New Jersey Division on Civil Rights

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our New Jersey Sexual Harassment Training

New Mexico

While sexual harassment training in New Mexico is not specifically required by state statute, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state protected characteristics.

The New Mexico Human Rights Act prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (40+), ancestry, color, disability or serious medical condition, gender identity, national origin, race, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, or a related condition), sexual orientation, and spousal affiliation.

For more information on New Mexico equal employment opportunity requirements, see New Mexico DWS Human Rights Bureau.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our New Mexico Sexual Harassment Training

New York State

All employers in New York are required to provide all employees anti-harassment training annually. The training must be interactive and include an explanation of what constitutes unlawful or sexual harassment, examples of conduct that would be considered unlawful or sexual harassment, information on state and federal laws concerning sexual harassment and resources for victims, and information on employees rights and forums for resolving complaints administratively and judicially. See New York State Human Rights Law.

For more information on New York equal employment opportunity requirements, see New York State Division on Human Rights.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Read our white paper detailing the requirements of New York’s sexual harassment training laws

New York City

All employers in New York City with more than 15 employees are required to provide annual anti-sexual harassment training to all employees, supervisors, and managers. Employers must provide anti-sexual harassment training to new employees who work more than 80 hours per year within 90 days of hire.

For more information on New York City equal employment opportunity requirements, see New York City Commission on Human Rights.

Read our white paper detailing the requirements of New York City’s sexual harassment training laws

North Carolina

While sexual harassment training in North Carolina is not specifically required by state statute, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state protected characteristics.

The North Carolina Equal Employment Practice Act establishes public policy against discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability. Additionally, the North Carolina Persons with Disabilities Protection Act prohibits discrimination based on disability; discrimination based on genetic information is prohibited by N.C. Gen. Stat. § 95-28.1 and N.C. Gen. Stat. § 95-28.1A; and discrimination based on status as a victim of domestic violence seeking relief is prohibited by N.C. Gen. Stat. § 50B-5.5.

For more information on North Carolina equal employment opportunity requirements, see North Carolina Human Relations Commission.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our North Carolina Sexual Harassment Training

North Dakota

According to the North Dakota Department of Labor, employers should provide training to prevent sexual harassment. See North Dakota DOL Brochure on Sexual Harassment in the Workplace (employers should “train managers and supervisors on sexual harassment issues” and “make employees are aware of their rights regarding filing equal employment complaints”).

Additionally, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state protected characteristics.

The North Dakota Human Rights Act prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (40+), color, disability, gender identity and expression, marital status, national origin (including lineal ancestry), race, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related conditions), and sexual orientation. (The North Dakota Department of Labor and Human Rights interprets state law consistent with the Supreme Court’s 2020 Bostock v. Clayton County decision. Therefore, discrimination based on gender identity or expression or based on sexual orientation is a form of sex discrimination in North Dakota.)

For more information on North Dakota equal employment opportunity requirements, see North Dakota Department of Labor and Human Rights.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about North Dakota Sexual Harassment Training

Ohio

According to the Ohio Administrative Code, employers should provide sexual harassment training. See Ohio Adm. Code 4112-5-05(J)(7) (“employer should take all steps necessary to prevent sexual harassment from occurring, such as affirmatively raising the subject, expressing strong disapproval, developing appropriate sanctions, informing employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under [state law] and developing methods to sensitize all concerned”).

Additionally, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state protected characteristics.

The Ohio Civil Rights Act prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (40+), ancestry, color, disability, national origin, race, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related conditions), and status of being servicemember Ohio militia or National Guard, or US Armed Services.

For more information on Ohio equal employment opportunity requirements, see Ohio Civil Rights Commission.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Ohio Sexual Harassment Training

Oklahoma

While sexual harassment training in Oklahoma is not specifically required by state statute, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state protected characteristics.

The Oklahoma Anti-Discrimination Act prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (40+), color, disability, genetic information, national origin, race, religion, and sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related conditions).

For more information on Oklahoma equal employment opportunity requirements, see Oklahoma Office of Attorney General.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about Oklahoma Sexual Harassment Training

Oregon

According to the Oregon BOLI Civil Rights Division, employers should provide sexual harassment prevention training. See Oregon BOLI Sexual Harassment Resources for Employers (employers “should emphasize the importance of its sexual harassment policy through communication and training. Training for staff is essential. …”). 

Additionally, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

Oregon law prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (18+), color, disability, gender identity, genetic information, marital status, national origin (including ancestry), race, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, breastfeeding/lactation, and related conditions), sexual orientation, and status of performing duty as servicemember of military or uniformed services. See Or. Rev. Stat. Ch 659A.

For more information on Oregon equal employment opportunity requirements, see Oregon BOLI Civil Rights Division.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Oregon Sexual Harassment Training

Pennsylvania

According to the Pennsylvania Commission on Human Rights, all employers should provide sexual harassment prevention training. See PCHR Guidelines on Sexual Harassment(“employers should take all steps necessary to prevent sexual harassment from occurring, such as affirmatively raising the subject, expressing strong disapproval, developing appropriate sanctions, informing employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under Title VII and the Pennsylvania Human Relations Act, and developing methods to sensitize all concerned.”) Additionally, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

The Pennsylvania Human Relations Act prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (40 or older), ancestry, color, disability, gender identity, national origin, race, religious creed, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related conditions), sexual orientation, and status as a user of a guide or support animal due to disability or as a handler or training of such animals.

For more information on Pennsylvania equal employment opportunity requirements, see Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Pennsylvania Sexual Harassment Training

Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico's Act 90-2020 requires all employers to adopt policies and to provide employees with education and guidance to prevent workplace bullying and harassment. See Puerto Rico Act 90-2020 and Guidelines on Workplace Harassment in Puerto Rico's Private Sector, issued Feb. 3, 2021 (Spanish).

The Act to Prohibit and Prevent Workplace Harassment in Puerto Rico (“Act”) applies to all employers and prohibits bullying or harassment of any employee.  To comply with the new law, all employers with employees in Puerto Rico must (a) adopt a policy, (b) post a notice, and (c) provide education and guidance on the new prohibition against harassment and bullying and the employer’s policy prohibiting such conduct.

Additionally, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

For more information on Puerto Rico equal employment opportunity requirements, visit www.trabajo.pr.gov (Spanish).

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Puerto Rico Sexual Harassment Training

Rhode Island

According to Rhode Island statute, all employers should provide training sexual harassment prevention for all new employees within one year of hire. The training should include information on the state’s statutory prohibition against harassment as well as the employer’s policy. Employers also should conduct additional training for supervisors within one year of hire or promotion to supervisory positions. The supervisor training should include the information provided to all employees, plus (a) the specific responsibilities of supervisory employees and (b) the methods supervisory employees should take to ensure immediate and appropriate corrective action in addressing sexual harassment complaints. See R.I. Gen. Laws ch. 118,§§ 28-51-2(c), 28-51-3.

Additionally, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

Rhode Island law prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (40+), color, country of ancestral origin, disability, gender identity or expression, genetic information, race, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related conditions), and sexual orientation. See Rhode Island Fair Employment Practices Act; Rhode Island Civil Rights Act; Rhode Island Civil Rights of People With Disabilities Act; and R.I. Gen. Laws § 28-6.7-1.

For more information on Rhode Island equal employment opportunity requirements, see Rhode Island Commission for Human Rights.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Rhode Island Sexual Harassment Training

South Carolina

While sexual harassment training in South Carolina is not specifically required by state statute, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

The South Carolina Human Affairs Law prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (40+), color, disability, national origin (including ancestry), race, religion (including all aspects of religious observance and practice), and sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, breastfeeding/lactation, and related conditions).

For more information on South Carolina equal employment opportunity requirements, see South Carolina Human Affairs Commission.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about South Carolina Sexual Harassment Training

South Dakota

According to the South Dakota Dept. of Labor & Regulation (SDDLR), Avoiding Discrimination, employers should “take all steps necessary to prevent sexual harassment from occurring. An effective prevention program should include an explicit policy against sexual harassment that is clearly and regularly communicated to employees and effectively implemented. The employer should affirmatively raise the subject with all supervisory and non-supervisory personnel, express strong disapproval, and explain the sanctions for harassment.” See South Dakota Dept. of Labor & Regulation (SDDLR), Avoiding Discrimination (pdf); SDDLR Division of Human Rights: Sexual Harassment/Discrimination (same). 

Additionally, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state protected characteristics.

South Dakota law prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on characteristics such as ancestry, color, creed, genetic information, national origin, race, religion, and sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related conditions).

For more information on South Dakota equal employment opportunity requirements, see SDDLR Division of Human Rights: Sexual Harassment/Discrimination.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our South Dakota Sexual Harassment Training

Tennessee

While sexual harassment training in Tennessee is not specifically required by state statute, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

The Tennessee Human Rights Act and the Tennessee Disability Act prohibit workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (40+), color, creed, disability, national origin (including ancestry), race, religion, and sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related conditions).

For more information on Tennessee equal employment opportunity requirements, see Tennessee Human Rights Commission.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Tennessee Sexual Harassment Training

Texas

The Texas Workforce Commission’s Civil Rights Division recommends that employers provide discrimination and harassment prevention training to (a) reduce complaints and associated costs, (b) improve the working environment, and (c) improve management decision-making. 

Additionally, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

Texas law prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (40+), color, disability, genetic information, national origin (including ancestry), race, religion (including all aspects of religious observance, practice, or belief), and sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions). See Texas Labor Code Chapter 21.

For more information on Texas equal employment opportunity requirements, see Texas Workforce Commission Civil Rights Division – Employment Discrimination.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Texas Sexual Harassment Training

Utah

While sexual harassment training in Utah is not specifically required by state statute, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state protected characteristics.

The Utah Antidiscrimination Act prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (40+), color, disability, gender identity, national origin (including ancestry), race, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, breastfeeding, and related conditions), and sexual orientation. Additionally, the Utah Genetic Testing Privacy Act prohibits employers from discriminating on the basis of genetic information.

For more information on Utah equal employment opportunity requirements, see Utah Antidiscrimination and Labor Division.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Utah Sexual Harassment Training.

Vermont

According to Vermont state statute, employers should conduct an education and training program for all existing and new employees within one year of hire to address the state’s prohibition against sexual harassment. See 21 Vt. Stat. Ann. § 495h (f)(1)-(3). Employers should provide additional training for supervisors and managers within one year of promotion, which should address, at a minimum, the details of the state statute prohibiting sexual harassment, “the specific responsibilities of supervisory and managerial employees, and the actions that these employees must take to ensure immediate and appropriate corrective action in addressing sexual harassment complaints.” Id.

Additionally, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

The Vermont Fair Employment Practices Act prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age, ancestry, color, disability, gender identity, national origin or place of birth, race, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, or related condition), sexual orientation, and status as a crime victim or family member of a crime victim. Additionally, 18 Vt Stat. Ann. § 9333 prohibits employers from discriminating on the basis of genetic information.

For more information on Vermont equal employment opportunity requirements, see Vermont Human Rights Commission.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Vermont Sexual Harassment Training

Virginia

While sexual harassment training in Virginia is not specifically required by state statute, it is generally recognized that employers should provide training. See, e.g., Alexandria Human Rights Commission recommending employers provide their employees and supervisors with training about sexual harassment). 

Additionally, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state protected characteristics.

Virginia law prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (40+), color, disability, gender identity, genetic information, marital status, national origin, race (including traits historically associated with race, such as hair texture, hair type, and protective hairstyles such as braids, locks, and twists), religion, sex/gender (including pregnancy, childbirth, breastfeeding/lactation, and related conditions), sexual orientation, and veteran status. See Virginia Human Rights Act; Virginians with Disabilities Act; and Va. Code. Ann. § 40.1-28.7:1 (prohibiting discrimination on the basis of genetic information).

For more information on Virginia equal employment opportunity requirements, see Virginia Division of Human Rights.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Virginia Sexual Harassment Training

Washington

All Washington employers: EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state-protected characteristics.

The Washington State Law Against Discrimination prohibits workplace harassment and discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (40+), color, creed/religion (including religious observance, practice, and belief), disability (including use of trained dog guide or service animal), gender identity or expression, genetic information, marital status, national origin (including ancestry), race (including traits historically associated with race, such as hair texture, hair type, and protective hairstyles such as afros, locks, braids, or twists), sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions), sexual orientation, or status as member of military or honorably discharged veteran.

For more information on Washington equal employment opportunity requirements, see Washington State Human Rights Commission

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Washington Sexual Harassment Training

Isolated Worker Employers: Under Washington law, hotel, motel, retail, security guard entity, or property services employers who employ isolated workers (defined as someone who spends a majority of their working hours alone or without another coworker present) must provide mandatory training to their managers, supervisors and employees. The training must include content on preventing sexual assault and sexual harassment in the workplace, preventing sexual discrimination in the workplace, and protections for employees who report violations of a state or federal law, rule, or regulation. For covered employers, all employees must be trained. See RCW 49.60.515.

Learn more about our Washington Sexual Harassment Training for Isolated Workers.

West Virginia

According to West Virginia’s Administrative Rules Regarding Sexual Harassment, employers should provide sexual harassment awareness and prevention training to all employees. The training should include “how to address problems through either informal or formal procedures, and how to be sensitive to general differences and problems in the workplace. Workers should be encouraged to report cases of harassment.” See W. Va. Admin Code s 77-4-3.5. See also WV Board of Risk and Insurance Management Model Harassment Prevention Policy.

Additionally, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state protected characteristics.

The West Virginia Human Rights Act and the West Virginia Pregnant Workers’ Fairness Act prohibit workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (40+), ancestry, color, disability, national origin, race, religion, and sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related conditions)

For more information on West Virginia equal employment opportunity requirements, see West Virginia Human Rights Commission Rules and Regulations.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our West Virginia Sexual Harassment Training

Wisconsin

According to the Wisconsin DWD Equal Rights Division, all employers should provide “training to educate employees on the issue of harassment and periodically remind them of your strong desire to maintain a harassment free workplace.” The Division also notes that “[h]ow an employer addresses harassment with its employees is likely to be the single most critical issue in determining liability in legal actions. See Wisconsin DWD-ERD, Harassment in the Workplace

Additionally, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state protected characteristics.

The Wisconsin Fair Employment Law prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (40+), ancestry, arrest or conviction record, color, creed/religion (including religious observance and practice), disability, genetic information, marital status, military service status, national origin, race, sex (including sex stereotyping and pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions), sexual orientation, and use or nonuse of lawful products off the employer’s premises during nonworking hours.

For more information on Wisconsin equal employment opportunity requirements, see Wisconsin DWD-Equal Rights Division – Employment Discrimination.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Wisconsin Sexual Harassment Training

Wyoming

According to the Wyoming Department of Workforce Services, training is an essential practice in discrimination and harassment prevention. See, for example, Wyoming DWS 2018 Safety & Workforce Summit at 8, 12. 

Additionally, EEOC guidelines and court decisions from around the country have made clear that employers should provide workplace harassment training to all employees periodically. The training should cover sexual harassment and all other forms of unlawful harassment related to federal and state protected characteristics.

The Wyoming Fair Employment Practices Act prohibits workplace harassment and employment discrimination based on protected characteristics such as age (40+), ancestry, color, creed, disability, national origin, race, and sex (including pregnancy).

For more information on Wyoming equal employment opportunity requirements, see Wyoming Department of Workforce Services – Labor Standards.

Local ordinances may provide broader protections, so you should check the local Civil Rights Commission regulations applicable to your workplace.

Learn more about our Wyoming Sexual Harassment Training

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